Workflows – how I mix

I thought I’d continue from my previous post about post production sound workflows. I used to work for a large company as a mixer. Although I did get involved in other areas my main work involved mixing other people’s tracklay. I found it quite a shock to start with as I’d done a little sound editing for others occasionally but I had mainly done all the design, tracklay and mix myself. It’s interesting to mix someone else’s work as it really highlights how different we all are in what we think should be done for a project.

In my previous post, I tried to stress how important it is to keep your work organised. Working with other people can really pay off. The first thing I did when I got the tracklay from someone else was to re-organise their work. Partly as I wanted it to fit how I mixed, but also to speed up my mix in the first place. On the whole though this was a minor thing and I’m certainly not implying that their work was disorganised.

My mix session template is a fairly complicated affair. Although quite elegant and efficient when you get to grips with it. The most complicated things I mix are normally animated series. So, for this post I will only discuss how I mix animations. My audio tracks are divided into sections (that I also colour code).

Dial

Music

SFX

Stereo SFX

Footsteps

Atmos

The first thing I do is mix the dialogue. It means I can concentrate on ensuring that the dialogue hits whatever broadcast specs I am working with. I can also tidy up the edits made by the editor. At this stage I also add any reverbs needed as a send effect.

There is no right or wrong way to mix really. I could pre-mix my sfx but for the animated shows I have worked on I have never found a benefit as the track count is too small and the sound edit is not that complicated. The only thing I do do is reduce the amount of sfx tracks to a minimum. I prefer this method as I only normally have 8 faders to work with and it saves time not having to constantly be scrolling through banks of empty tracks. I don’t find grouping the same sort of sounds together advantageous as again my track count is small and the simplicity of the animations. This isn’t a large feature film with lots of similar groups of sounds that need premixed. I also mix the music and effects together at the same time, again as it’s simpler to.

A quick tip here: For a series that uses the same locations I always spend time on the first episode to get the atmos tracks pre-mixed. Once done you can import those tracks without having to re-mix them again and again for each episode. Very handy too is to setup a session with a very long version of the pre-mixed atmos tracks. This is preferable than bouncing down an audio of the atmos mix in case you need to alter anything for a specific occasion.

Once I have finished mixing everything with the dialogue the show needs to be exported and sent to the director and producers for review. As previously stated I like to re-record my work within Pro Tools. It’s then easy to export the region as an mp3 to send to for review. I have worked a lot with people in a variety of countries and this remote method of working is quite nice once you get used to it. It’s also nice not having directors and producers having discussions (or arguments) about the mix while in the same room as you. Even with broadband internet speeds I still send a 320/kbps 48KHz mp3 as it still sounds good and takes a fraction of the time than a WAV.

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3 responses to “Workflows – how I mix

  1. Enjoyed your post Ian. Perhaps you could talk about broadcast specs at some stage, although these do differ. But things such as level expectations, compression, limiting, etc.

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